TAKE ACTION – What You Can Do

December 2008 • Issue 9

  1. Break the silence about boarding school abuses. Order the 18-minute documentary A Century of Genocide in the Americas: The Residential School Experience by Rosemary Gibbons and Dax Thomas (2002) and host an event to show it with friends, in your neighborhood, school, or organization. After the film, you can hand out paper and pens so everyone can write letters to the editor of your local paper. Pass the hat for donations to the Boarding School Healing Project. Check the Project’s Take Action page and write letters to the United Nations and other authorities to demand investigation of human rights violations. Distribute the video to libraries and media outlets in your community.
  2. Demand sexual assault services for Native women. For most women living on reservations, the Indian Health Service (IHS) emergency room is the only place to go after a sexual assault. But in 2005, the Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center found that 44% of IHS facilities lack trained personnel to provide emergency services after a rape, including post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to prevent HIV infection. According to Department of Justice statistics, rape in American Indian and Alaska Native populations is 3.5 times higher than among all other racial groups. 85% of perpetrators are non-Native men, most of them white. The U.S. government is required by legally binding treaties to provide health care to Native communities, which it promised in exchange for land it took. Go to the center’s Action Alert page to send an advocacy letter. For background info on sexual assault and Native women, watch the center’s videos on YouTube: Indigenous Women’s Reproductive Health Rights (2005) and Violence Against Women is Against the Law (2007). Amnesty International also has an Online Action Center page devoted to the issue.
  3. Join or start a Oaxaca solidarity group – like the ones in Austin, Chicago, Flagstaff, Portland, Santa Cruz, and other cities – in your hometown. There will continue to be urgent calls for solidarity with social movements in Oaxaca asking people to demonstrate at their nearest Mexican Consulate, and a group can help people mobilize quickly. Your group can also host speakers and film screenings to educate the community and raise money to support organizing and media work in Oaxaca. If there isn’t already a group in your area, contact one of the existing groups or visit elenemigocomun.net [The Common Enemy] for help starting one.
  4. Research local archives and government and church records for evidence of crimes in Native American boarding schools. If your church or government is responsible for abuses and/or deaths of Native children, take steps to hold it accountable. This could start just by talking with others in your community about it. Then, for example, you could work within your church organization to help (and pressure) it to gather information, release it publicly, and reach out to Native groups to offer restitution.
  5. Protest the Olympics in Vancouver, Canada. The 2010 Winter Olympics will take place on unceded indigenous land from February 12 to 28, 2010. According to the Olympics Resistance Network, the harmful effects have already begun – expansion of sport tourism and resource extraction on indigenous lands; increasing homelessness and gentrification of poor neighborhoods; more privatization of public services; union-busting, especially for migrant labor; the fortification of national security; ballooning public spending and public debt; and unprecedented destruction of the environment. Building on a call by Native activists, the network is organizing a protest convergence between February 10 and 15, 2010.
  6. Stay informed and involved. Visit Intercontinental Cry for frequently updated news, videos, and info about how you can support indigenous struggles around the world to reclaim their lands and protect their lives, their traditions, and the environment.
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Filed under Canada, displacement and gentrification, economic justice, immigration/migration, imperialism/colonialism, Mexico, Native Americans/Indigenous peoples, sexual violence, Solidarity Project, women

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